Steelhead Benchmark (Still Stands)

I’m one of those fishermen for whom fishing is always great even when catching isn’t so hot.

When I go out on the Lower Deschutes river with my son, Chris O’Donnell (owner/operator of River Runner Outfitters) whether on foot or in his drift boat, my day is made just by being with him, enjoying the sound of the river, feeling the motion of the boat, or the thrill of navigating (with him on the oars) whitewater that will flatten on the rocks any boat with an inexperienced captain.

On a trout trip, a single fat redside rainbow trout will more than make my day. On a steelhead trip, a grab, as we say, or a bite will suffice. I don’t knock myself out to hook fish. They’re a bonus.

But sometimes you get a day for the books.

Late last month Chris took me out on a day trip on our homewaters, the Lower Deschutes River. (He was the guide, but I insisted that he fish too.) Our quarry was summer steelhead, a close relative of the rainbow trout, except that the steelhead is anadramous, that is, born in a freshwater stream and then grows to maturity after migrating to the Pacific Ocean. They return, like salmon, to spawn, but unlike salmon, may make two or three trips back and forth before cashing in their chips.

At Chris’s house, we had a pre-dawn breakfast of hot Quaker Instant Oatmeal and strong coffee. Then we headed for the river. A friend accompanied us.

This past year I’ve developed a knee situation that has curtailed skiing and I thought that it might end fishing – at least wading, which I love to do. I can’t flex and put weight on the right knee without support from the left. Makes climbing stairs awkward. But my son would brook no excuses during the arrangement of the trip. “I’ll be right next to you as you move through the run, Dad.”

True to his word, Chris put me in more easily waded runs (less big rocks to trip on) and stayed right with me. I also learned that I could take a stab of pain to avoid folding and taking an unscheduled swim, but his strong arm was what really kept me out of the drink.

Remember I said a “grab” meant a good day of steelheading? This was a day for my record book. Chris set me up for two hookups and two steelhead landed. (We released them both – one hatchery, one wild.) I had this feeling that I was experiencing someone else’s life. We were swinging Intruder-style flies using spey rods and shooting line that can reach out on the river a loooong ways, but both of my fish were hooked on a second cast, darned near at my feet.

Our friend was also two for two, and Chris, who spent relatively little time angling, fished the runs after us, and gave us first choice wherever we fished, finished up three for four (one got loose). He also hooked two big rainbows, but they didn’t count on a steelhead day. All fish were released.

Three guys, seven for eight. Not bad.

North Oregon Coast Steelhead

Fly fishing for winter and spring steelhead in the heart of the Pacific Northwest.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

This is the two-minute video I wanted to feature a few days ago. Watch Chris wield a 12.5 foot two-handed (Spey) fly rod, and listen to his comments (along with some cool music), in pursuit of Oregon’s premiere freshwater game fish. Naturally, all the wild ones are released.

Time Out

Recently, my education projects have taken a familiar turn. Here in Oregon, we have laws that guarantee the public’s right to recreate (lawfully) on the state’s waterways. Sometimes these rights conflict with the beliefs of private property owners whose land borders waterways.

The picture you see is an extreme example of private landowner disregard for the public’s right to float a river. (Imagine moving on down this river and running into a barbed wire fence. There are other, legal methods of containing range cattle.)

Long story short, I took a little time out to put up a blog with some pages from the former web site of Common Waters of Oregon, a grassroots organization dedicated to preserving the rights of Oregonians and visitors to use our waterways.

I was a founding member of this not-for-profit outfit, and I figured that the holiday season was the time for me to “give back” because the site needed some updating and a way to interact with people who want to converse about “river rights.”

It’s also the holiday season, we have company, my favorite guide is visiting too, so, as the Science Goddess recommends, I’m kicking back for a while, like Santa, with a cool one. 😉

My best wishes for a joyous and safe holiday season, and a happy and prosperous new year.

See you soon!

The End of Bristol Bay’s Salmon?

Back in August, Scott Elias of Dare I Disturb the Universe, reminded us that today is Blog Action Day, and the theme is “Environment.” After global warming, this horror story rings my chimes.

The greatest wild salmon runs on the planet — Bristol Bay in Alaska — are in danger of being poisoned by the Pebble Creek mining operation poised to begin operations in a matter of months.

Watch the video, read what this usually conservative blogger has to say about it, then look around on the net and do whatever you can to bring this travesty to a halt. (I’m not a conservative, nor am I a liberal. Moderate Populist describes my POV.)