Grading Policy for Standards-Based Education

O'Connor 3rd Edition

Today’s ASCD Express featured a link to a “new voice,” Ken O’Connor, on grading for learning.

Ken is not exactly a new voice. He wrote his first grading piece for the NASSP Journal (National Association of Secondary School Principals) in 1995, and I had the great fortune to take a two-day ASCD Institute on “grading for learning” from Ken in Albuquerque, NM, in May of 2000.

Here is Ken’s summary of grading concepts that will help more students succeed in school.

Ken’s new 3rd edition of his comprehensive book on grading for learning is pictured above. It’s available from Assessment Training Institute (ETS) in Portland, Oregon, or Amazon.com.

Ken’s grading and assessment concepts should be part of every teacher’s toolkit.

BTW, if you’d like to see how I melded my philosophy with Ken’s principles, click here and scroll down to my grading guidelines that I wrote in 2000.

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Grading Policy for Standards-Based Education

  1. I really enjoyed meeting Ken in Hawaii a couple of springs ago. I was there for the AFL conference and I decided to really zero in on Ken and his sessions. He was very helpful and spent time with us before and after sessions. I learned a lot and I highly recommend the book.

    It has changed the way I look at assessment, but what’s more it has changed the way I interact with my students. It is no longer about me “grading” them as much as it is me, as a teacher, assisting and helping them learn. A world of difference.

    • It has changed the way I look at assessment, but what’s more it has changed the way I interact with my students. It is no longer about me “grading” them as much as it is me, as a teacher, assisting and helping them learn. A world of difference.

      You hit that nail on the head, Dave!

      Thanks for stopping by!

    • Tom, I would be tickled pink if every school district patron did what you did and read that book.

      If you would like more background on some of the most urgent grading issues, select “grading” in the Topics frame, and go for it.

      Do the same on The Science Goddess’s blog, What It’s Like On the Inside. She’s about to get a doctorate in how motivation and grading are connected.

  2. I am an avid supporter of SBG. However, I am still wary on the ways in which we have to turn their scores into a point grading system. The district I teach in wants the 9th grade teachers to start SBG, yet at the same time the whole school operates on a points system. I know there are a couple of ways to go about it, but will it last?

    I really enjoyed your comment on my last blog post. Thanks for stopping by.

    • I’d be wary too, Ashley. It’s what I think of as the “measurement briarpatch.” If you have to translate SBG scores into points, seek an algorithm with the least distortion, keeping in mind that a single “grade” doesn’t inform parents, students, or anyone else what the student actually knows, understands, and can do. Unless you are able to do pure SBG, you’re pretty much stuck with damage control.

      Thanks for stopping by…if you’d like to follow up, check out The Science Goddess, a former science teacher who works in the Washington State Department of Ed…she has a wicked sense of humor and irony. 🙂

      http://blog.whatitslikeontheinside.com/

      Best,

      Hugh

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s